Toothache From Sinus Infection: What You Need to Know

by TheGent7
toothache from sinus infection

Sinus infections are a common problem. If you have sinus pain, it can be hard to tell if you are experiencing sinusitis or toothache from sinus infection. This article will help explain the difference between sinusitis and toothache from sinus infection so that you can better understand what is happening with your body. We’ll then discuss how to treat each of these issues, as well as offer some tips for prevention!

What Is Toothache From Sinus Infection?

It is a sinus infection in your teeth. When you get a sinus infection in your teeth it can cause pain to be more pronounced because when bacteria migrate up into the nose they will infect any open sores within the mouth that exist. Often times this leads to swelling on top of inflammation which creates even more discomfort. It’s not unusual for someone with toothache from sinuses to have difficulty opening their mouth, chewing, or swallowing solid foods.

What Causes Toothache from Sinusitis?

The most common cause of toothache from sinusitis is when the sinuses become infected and pool up around the roots of the teeth which are located deep inside your gums. This can lead to swelling, pain, and irritation on or near your molars.

How Do I Know If My Toothache Is From Sinusitis?

If you have symptoms like a swollen face from toothache (especially around cheeks), headache, fever, coughs, congested nose with yellowish discharge that’s thicker than normal mucous then it may be sinusitis-related toothache! You might not know for sure unless you get an X-ray (note: sinusitis is not the only cause of toothache).

What Should I Do If My Toothache Is From Sininitsis?

You might need to take antibiotics and sometimes surgery. You should drink plenty of water, avoid caffeinated drinks (tea/coffee) which can dry you out, try using a humidifier in your room at night time and use saline nasal sprays or sinus rinse solutions to help with sinuses.

How Long Does it Last for If It’s Related With Sinusitis?

It could last up to two weeks but will depend on how severe the sinus infection is! There are usually specific treatments that your doctor may prescribe like painkillers etc depending on severity. However, sinusitis is considered to be a chronic condition and will return over time.

6 Causes Of Toothache Sinus Infection

1. Sinus infection. Sinus infections are common and can be caused by a variety of things (including allergies or catching a cold). Technically speaking, sinuses don’t actually contain any teeth – but the sinuses do sit near your top jawbone in an area called the maxillary sinus. When someone has sinusitis, their sinuses become inflamed and infected with bacteria that live normally on our skin.

This bacterial overgrowth leads to pain because it irritates nerves that travel through this area from the back of your nose down into your throat and mouth. The most commonly affected sinuses for toothache are supraorbital (above eyes) and sublabial (below the lip.)

2. Sinusitis. Sinus infections can lead to sinusitis, which is inflammation of the sinuses. It’s important for people with sinusitis to get treatment because it may cause complications such as high blood pressure and heart problems if left untreated.

3. Abscessed tooth or gum infection – abscesses are pockets of pus that form when an accumulation of bacteria causes a localized infection in your mouth; this could be due to biting yourself hard while eating or drinking something hot)

– Dental plaque build-up (plaque builds up on teeth and starts breaking down food particles, producing acids that irritate gums). Plaque buildup also leads to low levels of calcium in saliva, leading to recession (wearing away) of the gums.

– Dry mouth (dryness in your mouth due to reduced saliva production for a number of reasons, including Sjögren’s syndrome or medication use). Dry mouths can also lead to gum recession because there is less protection from bacteria that comes with having more moisture; this leads to chronic inflammation and swelling over time.

– Teeth grinding (grinding when sleeping at night), genetic tooth abnormalities such as impacted wisdom teeth, tongue thrusting habits, or clenching/clenching muscles around sinuses leading to temporomandibular joint dysfunction which causes pain in the upper jawbone if severe enough

4. Sinus headache – sinusitis can cause sinus headaches due to pressure in the sinuses. These sinus headaches are usually throbbing and last from a few hours to days, with no fever present (less common than sinus infection pain).

5. Toothache – if the nerve is exposed due to gum recession or cavity in your teeth, it can lead to toothaches; this happens when there is inflammation of the nerves inside the bone that lies beneath your gums and support your teeth. Toothaches are often felt around one side of the top jawbone area where these nerves reside but may also be felt on both sides depending on how severely infected/inflamed they are.

6. Cysts in sinuses – Sinus cavities can become enlarged by mucous-producing cells called sinus polyps, which are often benign and cause no problem. A sinus cyst is a fluid-filled sac that can form when nasal tumors (benign growths) grow into the sinuses; these sinus cysts may also be caused by injury or infection of nearby structures in your nose

7. Immune system problems – people who have disorders affecting their body’s ability to regulate their own immunity such as lupus erythematosus or HIV/AIDS may experience more frequent sinuses infections because they do not fight off bacteria very well.

8. Tooth abscess – if you have an infected tooth root canal surgery, then this could lead to pain in other areas of the face due to sinus pressure.

9. Sinus surgery – if you have had sinus surgery, then there may be scar tissue that has formed around the sinuses and can lead to toothache; this is especially common in people who are allergic to anesthesia or antibiotics.

10. Trismus- Trismus is a condition where someone’s lips cannot fully close due to inflammation of soft tissues like muscles or nerves which leads to pain when eating hot foods such as soup because it increases exposure time for teeth.)

Toothache Sinus Infection Symptoms

A sinus infection often produces these signs or symptoms:

1. nasal congestion,

2. Postnasal drip,

3. Headache

4. Facial pressure.

5. Swollen face (especially around cheeks)

6. Fever

7. Congested nose with yellowish discharge that’s thicker than normal mucous.

8. In chronic sinuses infections, people may also have an occasional cough for no apparent reason.

Can A Sinus Infection Cause Toothache?

Yes, a sinus infection can be causing toothache and headaches due to pressure in the sinuses. These sinus headaches are usually throbbing and last from a few hours to days, with no fever present (less common than sinus infection pain). Toothaches are often felt around one side of the top jawbone area where these nerves reside but may also be felt on both sides depending on how severely infected/inflamed they are.

Sinus cavities can become enlarged by mucous-producing cells called sinus polyps, which are often benign and cause no problem. A sinus cyst is a fluid-filled sac that can form when nasal tumors (benign growths) grow into the sinuses; these sinus cysts may also be caused by injury or infection of nearby structures in your nose. And this may cause toothaches for some people as well.

Can Sinus Infection Cause Bottom Tooth Pain?

Yes, sinusitis can cause lower teeth pain from a sinus infection. This is because the sinuses are located deep inside your gums and when they become infected this spreads to nearby tissue which then leads to swelling of those tissues around the roots of your bottom teeth in the lower jaw near your mouth.

The pressure on these sensitive areas causes pain in both upper and bottom teeth with their associated nerves.

Can Sinus Cause Tooth Pain In The Lower Jaw?

Yes, sinusitis can cause pain in the lower jaw. Sometimes sinuses do not drain properly, and fluid builds up around your teeth which leads to inflammation of the gums near the roots of the tooth. This is what causes dental pain from sinusitis that radiates down into your jaws and face.

Can Sinus Congestion Cause Toothache?

Yes, sinus congestion can cause toothache. If you have sinuses that are blocked by nasal congestion, then this will lead to fluid buildup and sinusitis which in turn causes pain in the teeth. Again, if inflammation is present around the mouth due to allergies or colds, these symptoms may worsen sinus problems too.

Toothache Pain From Sinus Infection

Yes, sinusitis toothache pain can be very painful. Sinus infections are often signaled by a sinus headache which is present on both sides of the head and is moderate to severe in intensity. Any sinuses that have been infected pool up around your teeth roots deep inside your gums and this causes swelling next to those areas leading to soreness or even mild pain in these sensitive regions like pain in the lower jaw too like when biting down hard with any pressure forces it against inflamed tissue near one’s mouth or cheek area for instance.

If sinusitis becomes untreated or the symptoms haven’t improved then toothache from sinus infections can get more intense and last longer. This is because if you don’t take care of your sinuses, they are going to continue to be inflamed which will cause them to become infected again without any relief in between.

You’ll also notice that sinus infection pain can start earlier in the day too instead of just at night time when it’s expected for something like this. The best way forward here would be seeing a doctor as soon as possible about potential treatment options so we’re not left with an even greater problem down the line!

Front Teeth Pain From Sinus Infection

Front teeth pain from sinusitis is a bit rarer but can happen. When you have sinus problems the sinuses around your nose can become inflamed and this may also affect those on either side of your mouth near the front teeth which then leads to swelling and toothache in these areas too.

If there isn’t any other possible cause for toothache such as grinding or biting down too hard then it’s most likely due to sinus infection.

Sinus Tooth Pain Worse At Night

Yes, sinus tooth pain can be worse at night for any of the sinuses. When sinuses are infected they cause swelling and this mostly occurs during the day when you’re more active but it may also continue while sleeping too, which causes a sense that there is pressure on your teeth or gums from inside as well as outside in the form of increased sensitivity to hot and cold foods.

Sinus Infection Toothache Relief

– Take sinus medicine as prescribed by your dentist or pharmacist.

– Use a humidifier at home to moisten the air in order to prevent sinus irritation and dryness, which can lead to sinusitis.

– Drink plenty of water, juices, and other fluids that will help you stay hydrated during this time. This is especially important for children who are more prone to dehydration than adults due to their smaller size and higher energy needs.

– Stay away from smoke cigarettes if possible because it irritates sinuses even further. If you have asthma, living with someone who smokes may make symptoms worse too. (On average two-thirds of smokers die prematurely).

If these treatments don’t work: Consider seeing your dentist or sinus specialist about sinus surgery.

Home Remedies to Relieve Sinusitis Symptoms

1. Lemon balm
Lemon balm helps to significantly reduce inflammation.

2. Chamomile and green tea
Green tea and chamomile contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which help clean the nasal cavity.

3. Vitamin C
Vitamin C is an essential nutrient in the body because it facilitates the proper functioning of the immune system, a system that protects the body from viral and bacterial infections.

4. Onions
Onions contain sulfur that acts as an antibacterial, and you can chew onions to create a powerful remedy for your nasal passages.

5. Saffron of India
Turmeric contains an effective anti-inflammatory substance known as curcumin that reduces the amount of excessive nasal drip at night.

6. Mint leaf
And it is by boiling mint leaves with water and drinking it daily to get the most out of it.

Do You Need a Doctor?

The answer is it depends on your age and other medical conditions but generally yes sinus infection should be treated with antibiotics because they promote faster healing and reduce complications such as abscesses (pockets of pus). Also, there’s a possibility for more serious health issues like acute maxillary sinusitis where the airway might become obstructed so we need immediate attention from a doctor.

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